After the first rush of emotions had settled, it was time to get take a serious look at what I had bought. The first thing on my mind was the sheer size of the boat. Everything felt huge after the old 7,7 meters long Maxi 77. One could walk straight up and the mast was almost as thick as a man’s waist. And I must admit it felt good have your boat at the dock of the big boats … =)

The mast seemed huge!

What, instead, began to bother quite quickly, was how alone I discovered that I was with the boat. Everything was new, starting from where the batteries could be found, how to start the engine, how to put all ropes etc.

The problem was that the former owner of the boat had Alzheimer’s disease and could not help at all, and his wife did not know anything about the boat. Things had to be learned the hard way. For example, to find the batteries, I had to open the floors and follow the wires. Finally, the batteries were found beneath the base of the storage space underneath the table …

In side the table there was a storage space that had a locker underneath, which contained the batteries…

I felt as though I was the anti midas.

The second big thing that caused the buyer’s remorse was the condition of everything. A few out of use also meant a lack of maintenance. For example, some of the railings were bent, the ropes were poor, the grommet for the electrics came off after touching it, as well as the drawers, the water pump was on half a minute and stopped working, the toilet did not empty etc. etc. I felt as though I was the anti midas.

At the same time, I was fixing the old boat for sale condition, so things moved on slowly. When there was no one interested in buying the old boat, the good drive was changing into despair.

Posted by:Liberta

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